Famous Coin Hoards

Randall Hoard

Randall Hoard of 5000 red/Brn BU large cents 1816 - 1820, Georgia 1868 By the 1950s groups were still found in dealer inventories

By 1990s they were mostly dispersed.

Economite Hoard, discovered 1878

In 1836 a cult of Rappites led by George Rapp hid away $75K FV of silver coins A partial list of the hoard included: Quarters (1818 to 1828) 400 pieces

Half Dollars

Flowing Hair (1794-1795) 800 pieces

Draped Bust, Small Eagle (1796-1797) 3 pieces

Draped Bust, Large Eagle (1801-1807) about 3,500 pieces

Capped Bust (1807-1836) about 110,000 pieces

Silver Dollars

Flowing Hair (1794-1795) 80 pieces

Draped Bust, Small Eagle (1796-1798) 230 pieces

Draped Bust, Large Eagle (1798-1803) about 2,700 pieces


Binion Hoard

Ted Binion was the youngest son of casino tycoon Ben Binion, who opened the Binion’s Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas in 1951. Son Ted grew up working different jobs at his father’s casino and was well-respected for his gambling acumen. Later in life, however, he began associating with a rough crowd, which ultimately led to the loss of his casino license and led to nefarious circumstances surrounding his death. In the wake of Ted’s passing in 1998, law enforcement officials discovered a 12-foot deep vault on his property in Pahrump, Nevada, which held roughly $7 million in treasure including over 100,000 Morgan and Peace silver dollars.


Frome Hoard of Ancients

The Frome Hoard of 52,503 ancient Roman coins was discovered in 2010 near the town of Frome in Somerset, England. Contained in a large buried ceramic pot and dating from A.D. 253-305, many of the coins were struck under the central Roman Empire, others were minted under the breakaway Gallic Empire, and some were issued by the independent Britannic Empire. While most ancient hoards were assumed to be buried for safekeeping, this pot was so large and fragile that the hoard may have been a communal offering to the gods.


Montana Hoard, 1988

Mistrustful of banks, George Bouvier of Deer Lodge, Montana, hid 8,000 silver dollars and other coins he'd accumulated during his lifetime in his house walls. He also buried coffee cans full of coins under the floor of his shop. On his deathbed, he told a young friend about the hoard. The youth later told Bouvier's relatives, whose search turned up over 17,000 coins. Littleton Coins purchased enough coins from the hoard to assemble 500 all-mint sets of 1921


Redfield Hoard, 1974

LaVere Redfield was a "hard money" fanatic who hated the government and refused to pay taxes. Redfield was not a coin collector. He did, however, have a unique interest in Morgan silver dollars. Friends at local banks would let him know when they had bags of silver dollars, usually Morgans.


Redfield often dropped the bags of silver dollars down a coal chute to be stored in his cellar. Redfield amassed more than 500,000 silver dollars over three decades.


After Redfield's death in 1974, a complete inventory of his estate was taken. Between 520,000 and 650,000 silver dollars were found, dwarfing any previous hoard! A judge decreed that the best way to settle Redfield's estate was to hold an auction for the coins. When it was over, the A-Mark Coin Company became the new owner of the Redfield Hoard for $7.3 million! An exact inventory of the hoard has never been released and details of the purchase are to this day vague.


Paramount Coins graded and encapsulated these coins in red pack holders for the MS-65s and black pack holders for the MS-60s. Some of these have since been graded by NGC without removing them from their original encapsulation. The red packs trade at a premium, $200 -$220 each, when raw sell for $60.


Midwest Megahoard, 1998

The largest coin hoard ever, holding 1.7 million Indian Head cents and Liberty and Buffalo nickels. Hidden in the walls of a Midwest collector's house, the stash had been out of circulation since the 1950s and '60s. The coins, weighing 7.6 tons, were stored in canvas sacks and 55‑gallon drums.



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